March Is National Nutrition Month

March Is National Nutrition Month

Everything you eat and drink matters – focus on variety, amount, and nutrition.

 

Focus on Whole Fruits:

  • Most fruits are naturally low in fat, sodium, and calories. None have cholesterol.
  • Fruits are sources of many essential nutrients that are underconsumed, including potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin C, and folate (folic acid).
  • Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. Fruit sources of potassium include bananas, prunes, dried peaches and apricots, cantaloupe, honeydew melon, and oranges.

 

Vary Your Veggies:

  • Select vegetables with more potassium often, such as sweet potatoes, white potatoes, white beans, tomato products (paste, sauce, and juice), beets, greens, soybeans, lima beans, spinach, lentils, and kidney beans.
  • Grill vegetable kabobs as a colorful addition to a meal. Try tomatoes, mushrooms, green peppers, and onions.
  • Shred carrots or zucchini into meatloaf, casseroles, quick breads, and muffins.

 

Protein Provides Power:

  • Proteins function as building blocks for bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood. They are also building blocks for enzymes, hormones, and vitamins. Proteins are one of three nutrients that provide calories (the others are fat and carbohydrates).
  • Get Nutty! Eating peanuts and certain tree nuts (i.e., walnuts, almonds, and pistachios) may reduce the risk of heart disease when consumed as part of a diet that is nutritionally adequate and within calorie needs. Because nuts and seeds are high in calories, eat them in small portions.
  • Meat, poultry, fish, dry beans and peas, eggs, nuts, and seeds supply many nutrients. These include protein, B vitamins (niacin, thiamin, riboflavin, and B6), vitamin E, iron, zinc, and magnesium.

 

All Food and Beverage Choices Matter:

  • Eat the right amount of calories for you based on your age, sex, height, weight, and physical activity level.
  • Building a healthier eating style can help you avoid overweight and obesity and reduce your risk of diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

Practical changes to the meals you commonly eat can improve your diet, your overall health and may contribute to better hearing health!