Auditory Processing Evaluation

Auditory processing disorder (APD), a neurological condition also known as central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), affects the brain’s ability to process auditory input, making it difficult to understand speech, follow oral instructions, or distinguish speech in noisy environments.

The disorder can affect anyone but is estimated to appear in as many as 5 to 7 percent of school-age children, according to the Auditory Processing Disorder Foundation, with boys diagnosed twice as often as girls.

Though APD awareness has increased in recent years, confusion about the disorder abounds. It can appear simultaneously with conditions such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, so it’s important that those with APD symptoms get evaluated by an audiologist for proper diagnosis.

What Are the Symptoms of Auditory Processing Disorder?

In essence, APD is a learning and social-communication disability, not a hearing problem. In patients with APD, hearing thresholds are often normal, but the central nervous system has trouble processing what’s being heard. Symptoms typically appear at a young age and can range from mild to severe.
 

Some signs and symptoms include the following:

  • Difficulty listening or learning auditorily
  • Problems following multistep directions
  • Difficulty with reading, spelling, or academics
  • Problems filtering out background noise
  • Hypersensitivity to or reduced tolerance for noise
  • Frequent mishearing or misunderstanding of speech
  • Difficulty understanding muffled, fast, or distorted speech
  • Problems remembering what was heard
  • Problems distinguishing between similar speech sounds
  • Difficulty organizing verbal information
  • Problems with oral and written expression

Girl reading with teacher